Acute low back pain self-management intervention for urban primary care patients: rationale, design, and predictors of participation

Journal Name: 
Arthritis Rheum
Authors: 
Damush,T.M.
Weinberger,M.
Clark,D.O.
Tierney,W.M.
Rao,J.K.
Perkins,S.M.
Verel,K.
Abstract: 
OBJECTIVES: To describe the rationale and design of a self-management program for low-income, urban, primary care patients with acute low back pain. Issues related to recruitment and protocol delivery, and attendance patterns and predictors of program attendance are described. METHODS: Two hundred eleven adult patients (73% female; 60% African American) were recruited from primary care neighborhood health centers. Focus groups were conducted for program development, and participants then completed a baseline interview and were randomized into groups receiving either usual care or a self-management intervention. RESULTS: Twenty-nine percent of the intervention group attended the self- management class. Significant predictors of attendance included being older, reporting less income, and not working for pay. Attendees did not differ from nonattendees on back pain severity, symptoms, health- related quality of life, self-management processes, or satisfaction with care. CONCLUSION: Effective minimal-contact behavioral interventions are needed to reach larger portions of the patient population.
2002
Volume: 
47
Pages: 
372-379
Keywords: 
380, Acute Disease, Adult, African American, African-American, Aged, Aged,80 and over, delivery, Development, Female, Focus Groups, Health, Hospitals,University, Human, Income, Indiana, intervention, Life, Longitudinal Studies, Low Back Pain: physiopathology: therapy, low-income, Male, Methods, Middle Age, older, Pain, patient, Patient Participation, Patient Selection, Patients, population, primary care, Primary Health Care, quality, Quality of Life, ResNet, Self Care: methods, Support,U.S.Gov't,Non-P.H.S., Support,U.S.Gov't,P.H.S., Urban Population