A controlled trial of methods for managing pain in primary care patients with or without co-occurring psychosocial problems

Journal Name: 
Ann Fam Med
Authors: 
Ahles,T.A.
Wasson,J.H.
Seville,J.L.
Johnson,D.J.
Cole,B.F.
Hanscom,B.
Stukel,T.A.
McKinstry,E.
Abstract: 
PURPOSE: Pain, a common reason for visits to primary care physicians, is often not well managed. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of pain management interventions suitable for primary care physicians. METHODS: Patients from 14 rural primary care practices (47 physicians) who reported diverse pain problems with (n = 644) or without (n = 693) psychosocial problems were randomized to usual-care or intervention groups. All patients in the intervention group received information tailored to their problems and concerns (INFO). These patients' physicians received feedback about their patients' problems and concerns (FEED). A nurse-educator (NE) telephoned patients with pain and psychosocial problems to teach problem-solving strategies and basic pain management skills. Outcomes were assessed with the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form and the Functional Interference Estimate at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. RESULTS: Patients with pain and psychosocial problems randomized to INFOFEED+NE significantly improved on the bodily pain (P = .011), role physical (P = .025), vitality (P
7
2006
Volume: 
4
Pages: 
341-350
Keywords: 
Adult, Aged, electronic, Feedback, Female, Humans, information, intervention, Male, medical, Methods, Middle Aged, Pain, patient, Patient Education as Topic, Patients, Physicians, primary care, Primary Health Care, Professional-Patient Relations, Psychiatry, psychology, Research, Research Support, Role, Rural Population, support, Telephone, therapy