Do older people benefit from having a confidant? An Oklahoma Physicians Resource/Research Network (OKPRN) study

Journal Name: 
J.Am.Board Fam.Med.
Authors: 
Lawler,F.H.
Mold,J.W.
McCarthy,L.H.
Abstract: 
OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine whether having a confidant was associated with improved health-related quality of life (HRQoL) or survival in older, community-dwelling individuals. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included 23 family physician members of the Oklahoma Physicians Research/Resource Network in 9 practices and 852 community-dwelling adults 65 or older participating in the Oklahoma Longitudinal Assessment of Health Outcomes of Mature Adults Studies. Longitudinal models analyzed changes in self-administered Quality of Well-Being (QWB-SA) scores over an average (S.D.) of 2.51 (1.28) years. Cox proportional hazards models assessed variables possibly associated with mortality over an average survival time (+/-S.D.) of 9.22 (3.24) years. We controlled for chronic illnesses, baseline age, gender, marital status, income, race, BMI, education and specified Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36) domain scores. RESULTS: Initially, 740 participants (87%) had a confidant. Being married was strongly associated with having a confidant (91.9% vs. 77.8%, p
1
2013
Volume: 
26
Pages: 
9-15
Keywords: 
740, Adult, better, Cohort Studies, Death, education, Family, Health, Income, Life, Marital Status, medical, Medicine, Methods, Morbidity, Mortality, Oklahoma, OKPRN, older, Physicians, Proportional Hazards Models, quality, Quality of Life, race, Research, Research Support, Risk, support, Time, Universities