Evaluating the accuracy of a geographic closed-ended approach to ethnicity measurement, a practical alternative

Journal Name: 
Ann.Epidemiol.
Authors: 
Omand,J.A.
Carsley,S.
Darling,P.B.
Parkin,P.C.
Birken,C.S.
Urquia,M.L.
Khovratovich,M.
Maguire,J.L.
Abstract: 
PURPOSE: Measuring ethnicity accurately is important for identifying ethnicity variations in disease risk. We evaluated the degree of agreement and accuracy of maternal ethnicity measured using the new standardized closed-ended geographically based ethnicity question and geographic reclassification of open-ended ethnicity questions from the Canadian census. METHODS: A prospectively designed study of respondent agreement of mothers of healthy children aged 1-5 years recruited through the TARGet Kids! practice-based research network. For the primary analysis, the degree of agreement between geographic reclassification of the Canadian census maternal ethnicity variables and the new geographically based closed-ended maternal ethnicity variable completed by the same respondent was evaluated using a kappa analysis. RESULTS: Eight hundred sixty-two mothers who completed both measures of ethnicity were included in the analysis. The kappa agreement statistic for the two definitions of maternal ethnicity was 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.84-0.90) indicating good agreement. Overall accuracy of the measurement was 93%. Sensitivity and specificity ranged from 83% to 100% and 96% to 100%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The new standardized closed-ended geographically based ethnicity question represents a practical alternative to widely used open-ended ethnicity questions. It may reduce risk of misinterpretation of ethnicity by respondents, simplify analysis, and improve the accuracy of ethnicity measurement
4
2014
Volume: 
24
Pages: 
246-253
Keywords: 
Aged, analysis, Canada, Child, Disease, electronic, evaluation, Health, Health Policy, hospital, knowledge, Medicine, Methods, Mothers, Nutritional Sciences, Pediatrics, practice-based research, Public Health, Research, Risk, Sensitivity and Specificity, Universities