Evaluating the Development, Implementation and Dissemination of a Multisite Card Study in the WWAMI Region Practice and Research Network

Journal Name: 
Clin.Transl.Sci.
Authors: 
Cole,A.
Keppel,G.A.
Linares,A.
Alto,W.
Kriegsman,W.
Reed,A.
Holmes,J.
Mohanachandran,M.
Baldwin,L.M.
Abstract: 
BACKGROUND: Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) promote the conduct of research in real-world settings by engaging primary care clinicians as champion research collaborators. Card studies are brief surveys administered to patients or clinicians at the point of care. The objective of this paper is to describe the design and evaluation of a card study methodology that the WWAMI Region Practice and Research Network (WPRN) used to develop research partnerships across multiple member sites. METHODS: We used a collaborative model to develop, implement and disseminate the results of a network-wide card study to assess patient preferences for weight loss in primary care. After the card study data collection was completed, we conducted individual and focus group interviews and a brief survey of participating practice champions. RESULTS: Increased research engagement and personal and professional developments were the primary motivators for participating in the development of the card study. Increasing research activity at practices and learning information about patients were motivators for implementing the study. Their participation resulted in champions reporting increased confidence in collaborating on research projects as well as the development of new clinical services for patients. DISCUSSION: This collaborative model positively influenced research capacity in the WPRN and may be a useful strategy for helping PBRNs conducted translational research. Clin Trans Sci 2015; Volume #: 1-6
7
14
2015
Keywords: 
clinical, Colorado, data, Data Collection, Development, electronic, evaluation, Family, FAMILY medicine, Health, information, Interviews, Learning, medical, Medicine, Methods, Paper, partnership, patient, Patient Preference, Patients, practice-based research, primary care, Research, survey, Translational Research, Universities, Washington, Weight Loss