Pediatric Providers' Attitudes Toward Retail Clinics

Journal Name: 
J Pediatr.
Authors: 
Garbutt,J.M.
Mandrell,K.M.
Sterkel,R.
Epstein,J.
Stahl,K.
Kreusser,K.
Sitrin,H.
Ariza,A.
Reis,E.C.
Siegel,R.
Pascoe,J.
Strunk,R.C.
Abstract: 
OBJECTIVE: To describe pediatric primary care providers' attitudes toward retail clinics and their experiences of retail clinics use by their patients. STUDY DESIGN: A 51-item, self-administered survey from 4 pediatric practice-based research networks from the midwestern US, which gauged providers' attitudes toward and perceptions of their patients' interactions with retail clinics, and changes to office practice to better compete. RESULTS: A total of 226 providers participated (50% response). Providers believed that retail clinics were a business threat (80%) and disrupted continuity of chronic disease management (54%). Few (20%) agreed that retail clinics provided care within recommended clinical guidelines. Most (91%) reported that they provided additional care after a retail clinic visit (median 1-2 times per week), and 37% felt this resulted from suboptimal care at retail clinics "most or all of the time." Few (15%) reported being notified by the retail clinic within 24 hours of a patient visit. Those reporting prompt communication were less likely to report suboptimal retail clinic care (OR 0.20, 95% CI 0.10-0.42) or disruption in continuity of care (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.15-0.71). Thirty-six percent reported changes to office practice to compete with retail clinics (most commonly adjusting or extending office hours), and change was more likely if retail clinics were perceived as a threat (OR 3.70, 95% CI 1.56-8.76); 30% planned to make changes in the near future. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the perceived business threat, pediatric providers are making changes to their practice to compete with retail clinics. Improved communication between the clinic and providers may improve collaboration
6
27
2013
Keywords: 
Attitude, better, Chronic Disease, clinical, collaboration, Communication, Disease, Disease Management, electronic, Guidelines, interaction, patient, Patients, Perception, perceptions, practice-based research, primary care, provider, Research, response, survey, Time, Universities, Washington