A prospective study of body size and breast cancer in black women

Journal Name: 
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Authors: 
Palmer,J.R.
ms-Campbell,L.L.
Boggs,D.A.
Wise,L.A.
Rosenberg,L.
Abstract: 
The relation of body mass index (BMI) and weight gain to breast cancer risk is complex, and little information is available on Black women, among whom the prevalence of obesity is high. We assessed BMI and weight gain in relation to breast cancer risk in prospective data from the Black Women's Health Study. In 1995, 59,000 African American women enrolled in the Black Women's Health Study by completing mailed questionnaires. Data on anthropometric factors were obtained at baseline and every 2 years afterwards. In 10 years of follow-up, 1,062 incident cases of breast cancer occurred. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) were computed in multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. BMI at age 18 years of >/=25 relative to
9
2007
Volume: 
16
Pages: 
1795-1802
Keywords: 
10, 1010, Adolescent, Adult, African American, African Americans, African-American, Age Factors, Body Composition, Body Mass Index, Body Size, Breast, Breast Neoplasms, Cohort Studies, epidemiology, Ethnic Groups, factors, Female, genetics, Health, Humans, Incidence, information, Middle Aged, Obesity, older, Overweight, Postmenopause, Premenopause, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Questionnaires, regression, Research, Research Support, Risk, Risk Factors, support, therapy, understanding, United States, Universities, Weight Gain, women, Women's Health