Use of mobile health (mHealth) tools by primary care patients in the WWAMI region Practice and Research Network (WPRN)

Journal Name: 
J.Am.Board Fam.Med.
Authors: 
Bauer,A.M.
Rue,T.
Keppel,G.A.
Cole,A.M.
Baldwin,L.M.
Katon,W.
Abstract: 
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of mobile health (mHealth) use among primary care patients and examine demographic and clinical correlates. METHODS: Adult patients who presented to 1 of 6 primary care clinics in a practice-based research network in the northwest United States during a 2-week period received a survey that assessed smartphone ownership; mHealth use; sociodemographic characteristics (age, sex, race/ethnicity, health literacy); chronic conditions; and depressive symptoms (2-item Patient Health Questionnaire). Data analysis used descriptive statistics and mixed logistic regression. RESULTS: Of 918 respondents (estimated response rate, 67.4%), 55% owned a smartphone, among whom 70% were mHealth users. In multivariate analyses, smartphone ownership and mHealth use were not associated with health literacy, chronic conditions, or depression but were less common among adults >45 years old (adjusted odds ratio, 0.07-0.39; P < .001). Only 10% of patients learned about mHealth tools from their physician, and few (31%) prioritized their provider's involvement. CONCLUSIONS: Use of mHealth technologies is lower among older adults but otherwise is common among primary care patients, including those with limited health literacy and those with chronic conditions. Findings support the potential role of mHealth in improving disease management among certain groups in need; however, greater involvement of health care providers may be important for realizing this potential
11
2014
Volume: 
27
Pages: 
780-788
Keywords: 
Adult, analysis, clinical, data, Depression, depressive, Disease, Disease Management, Family, FAMILY medicine, Health, health care, Health Literacy, Medicine, Methods, Odds Ratio, older, Ownership, patient, Patients, practice-based research, Prevalence, primary care, provider, Psychiatry, regression, Research, Research Support, response, Role, Statistics, support, survey, tools, United States, Universities, Washington