What if we were equal? A comparison of the black-white mortality gap in 1960 and 2000

Journal Name: 
Health Aff (Millwood)
Authors: 
Satcher,D.
Fryer,G.E.,Jr.
McCann,J.
Troutman,A.
Woolf,S.H.
Rust,G.
Abstract: 
The United States has made progress in decreasing the black-white gap in civil rights, housing, education, and income since 1960, but health inequalities persist. We examined trends in black-white standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for each age-sex group from 1960 to 2000. The black-white gap measured by SMR changed very little between 1960 and 2000 and actually worsened for infants and for African American men age thirty-five and older. In contrast, SMR improved in African American women. Using 2002 data, an estimated 83,570 excess deaths each year could be prevented in the United States if this black-white mortality gap could be eliminated
3
2005
Volume: 
24
Pages: 
459-464
Keywords: 
1960, 2000, Adolescent, Adult, African American, African Americans, African-American, Aged, Aged,80 and over, Child, Child,Preschool, Comparative Study, Comparison, Death, education, epidemiology, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Georgia, Health, Housing, Humans, Income, Infant, Male, Medicine, Middle Aged, Mortality, older, primary care, Research, Research Support, Social Justice, support, trends, United States, women