What keeps patients from adhering to a home blood pressure program?

Journal Name: 
J Am Board.Fam.Med
Authors: 
Huff,L.S.
Zittleman,L.
Dealleaume,L.
Bernstein,J.
Chavez,R.
Sutte,C.
Leblanc,W.G.
Parnes,B.
Abstract: 
BACKGROUND: Home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) predicts cardiovascular risk and increases hypertension control. Non-participation in HBPM is prevalent and decreases the potential benefit. METHODS: Telephone surveys were conducted with a random quota sample of non-participants in a HBPM program, which supplied a complimentary automated blood pressure cuff and utilized a centralized reporting system. Questioning assessed use of monitors, perceived benefit, communication with providers, and barriers. RESULTS: There were 320 completed surveys (response rate 53%). Of non-participants, 70.2% still used HBPM cuffs and 58% communicated values to providers. Spanish-speakers were 4.4 times more likely to not use cuffs (95% CI, 2.22-8.885). Barriers to participation were largely personal (forgetting, not having time, or self-described laziness). Reasons for not communicating readings with providers were largely clinic factors (no doctor visit, doctor didn't ask, thinking doctor wouldn't care). Lack of knowledge of HBPM and program design also contributed. After being surveyed, patients were over three times more likely to use the central reporting system. Discussion: Most non-participants still used HBPM and communicated values to providers, suggesting many "drop-outs" may still receive clinical benefit. However, much valuable information is not utilized. Future programs should focus on reminder systems, patient motivation, education, and minimizing time involvement
7
2011
Volume: 
24
Pages: 
370-379
Keywords: 
320, blood, Blood Pressure, clinical, Colorado, Communication, education, factors, Family, Hypertension, information, knowledge, Medicine, Methods, Motivation, patient, Patients, provider, Reading, Reminder Systems, response, Risk, survey, system, Telephone, Universities